#marilynallenphd

Let's Talk About ... Cholesterol

It is important to manage cholesterol levels as a preventative measure, especially, those who are predisposed to high cholesterol. As part of your holistic regime to well being, the onus is on you to manage/cut back on your LDLs by reducing or eliminating ingredients that increase LDLs in your diet.

 

Managing your cholesterol can be done by introducing some ingredients into your meals. These ingredients bind cholesterol with fibre and eliminate through the digestive system. Some of these ingredients contain plant sterols and stanols which block the body from absorbing cholesterol.

 

 

 

References

Butterfield, C., 2015. Lower Cholesterol: Reduce Blood Pressure and Stress (Life) Wilkinson Pub

 

 

Photo Credit: healthack, parkseed, cookinglight, louisana green, healthline, triumph dining.

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Effectiveness of SCIO-Eductor

- Regeneration after sports injuries

- Musculoskeletal issues

- Stress induced depression

- stress induced insomnia

- Stress induced anxiety

- Stress induced allergic reactions

- Stress related cardiovascular issues

- Rehabilitation of muscles

- Pain management

- Stress induced digestive issues

- Inflammation

- Detection of stress

- Managing stress

 

Repost from SCIO-Eductor Official

How people with sports addiction are like drug addicts

Repost from Aeon by Karin Jongsma who is a bioethicist at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen in Germany. She is interested in identity, technology, representation and autonomy, and is currently working on a research project concerning collective representation in healthcare policy.

Participation in sports is a highly visible aspect of 21st-century life, with a normative dimension. Sport benefits health, encourages self-discipline, and develops character and teamwork. The positive physiological and psychological effects of sport and an active lifestyle are scientifically well-known: improved cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, lower risk of osteoporosis and depression, and an increased life expectancy. Based on all this good news, one might wonder whether there is any downside.

‘Sports addiction’ sounds paradoxical, because we usually reserve the word ‘addiction’ for things that are recognisably bad for us, such as illicit-drug use or alcoholism, but there really is a sense in which you can become addicted to exercise. Even modest athletes can relate to the famous ‘high’ after exercising, triggered by the release of ‘happiness hormones’ such as dopamine and endorphins, which have mood-altering effects. These effects, like those produced by illicit drugs and alcohol, can be habit-forming. As in any addiction, ‘highs’ are important for getting hooked, but the development of an addiction depends on many external factors, too. Sports addiction is not taken seriously by everyone, however: ‘there are worse things to be addicted to’ mockers suggest, as if the term ‘addiction’ is only a metaphor. Sports addiction is, however, real, non-metaphorical, and harmful.

Sport addicts share many symptoms with other sorts of addicts. They harm their bodies: this is because they do not give them the chance of recovering from working out, often because of the intensity, duration and frequency of their training sessions. Sport becomes so much an obsession that such people don’t take time to recover from injuries. Incidence of heart attacks and osteoporosis increase at high levels of exertion, so sports addicts can put themselves at serious risk of harm.

But it is not just a question of physical damage: sports addicts suffer psychological damage too: they become dependent on training for feeling good, and life away from training becomes dull. They can also develop tolerance to the ‘high’, and so need more and more exercise to get the same result. When not exercising, they experience withdrawal effects, depression and anxiety. Sports addiction has negative social effects, too: addicts cancel meetings because they prefer training over friends, family and work, or are mentally not present when they are with other people, so preoccupied are they with mentally preparing for that next training session high.

The complexity of sports addiction lies in the fact that a reasonable amount of exercise and sport is good, but too much can be very harmful indeed. However, such harmful effects are not understood nor widely recognised, as the social perception of sports addiction differs significantly from other types of addiction.

But is it as simple as this? Is sports addiction always something to be ashamed of, something to be treated or overcome? In other areas of physical prowess, significant harm is tolerated for the sake of an outstanding outcome, and might even be the price paid for excellence. Many ballet dancers have ruined feet, for example; and many musicians have injuries as a result of over-practice or repetition in performance. Similarly, many professional boxers suffer from brain damage through repeated sparring, and athletes, footballers and rugby players have been badly injured during high-level sports training.

But these are highly talented people capable of beautiful, exciting and sometimes dangerous things, which ordinary people will never be able to do. Are all of them addicts? Probably not. However, many of them tread a fine line between devotion and addiction, and illustrate how obsessive devotion, beyond ordinary levels, has the double potential both for great achievement and for significant self-harm. If we value the achievement, perhaps we will have to accept that there will be some collateral damage along the way.

Human Voices Are More Than Just Sound ...

 

To make sense of human voices, we rely on senses beyond hearing. The songs of Taylor Swift can be sweet and soft. Lady Gaga's singing feels dark. Johnny Cash's voice was low and rough. That's because voice is not just sound: It can be seen and heard, but also tasted and touched. The sound we hear in voice creates "multisensory images" — drawing in perceptions from many senses, not just one.

The phenomenon of multisensory perception can help us to understand why we assign metaphorical properties of softness, roughness, or depth to voice. Think of a politician whose voice is flat. Flatness is a multisensory concept because it is both tactile and visual. We can recognize flat surfaces by either touching or seeing them. These sensory impressions inform us about the acoustic characteristics of voice, implying that it does not have variation in tone. Notably, flatness can also convey lack of sympathy and emotion on the part of the speaker. 

Softness is another common way to present the auditory perception of sound. Like flatness, it can describe not only the sound quality but also the speaker's emotional state. And what about sharpness, a descriptor that might relate to both tactile and visual experience? Calling a voice sharp could be a metaphor for an aggressive, nasty speaker — or a means of describing acoustic, vocal sounds.

Multisensory images allow us to identify and deal with things that can harm or benefit us. A falling mortar shell, a jumping tiger, or a skidding car are not just auditory or visual images: They are perceived as multisensory images and can be conceived of as potential life threats. In cognitive psychology, it is generally recognized that, as Vanessa Harrar of the University of Oxford puts it, "integrating information from individual senses increases the chance of survival by reducing the variability in the incoming signals, thus allowing us to respond more rapidly." In fact, notes Harrar, when the components of the multisensory signals are simultaneous, our reaction time is fastest of all. 

The psychologist Charles Spence at the University of Oxford has done extensive research on how humans integrate sensory information with respect to culinary experience, finding that vision and hearing can change how food tastes. One study found that desserts tasted sweeter on a white plate than a black plate. Another study found that heavy cutlery made food taste better.

The multisensory perceptions that result in metaphors help us to think about relatively abstract things with more familiar ideas. In Metaphors We Live By (2003), the linguist George Lakoff and the philosopher Mark Johnson, who devised "conceptual metaphor theory," say that humans use concrete ideas to understand abstract phenomena. Linguistic and psychological research supports the idea that metaphors empower our abstract thought about timemoneymoralitydeath, and even orgasm. Time, for example, is an abstract idea, and we tend to understand it through the more concrete-seeming experience of space: Time can flow, and it can stand still. Our past is better left behind, because our future lies ahead. Indifference or hostility are complex social concepts that can be conveyed through the experience of feeling cold. Coldness is tangible and vividly communicates the message. If someone's voice is described as cold, people associate this sensory image with the emotional state of the speaker. In a similar vein, the acoustic properties of voice can be associated with other sensory experiences. A sharp voice can refer to both vision and the sense of touch.

Depicting how something "feels" is one of the most common ways we use metaphors, especially when describing voices. That makes enormous sense because touch is a much earlier evolutionary development than speech, and is vital in daily life. In Consciousness and the World (2000), the Australian philosopher Brian O'Shaughnessy considered touch the primordial sense because "it is scarcely to be distinguished from the having of a body that can act in physical space." And the evolutionary psychologist Robin Dunbar at the University of Oxford argues that touch plays a significant role in social bonding in primates (including humans). Writing here at Aeon, the integrative biologist Steven Phelps at the University of Texas draws on Dunbar's research to argue that the use of touch for strengthening social relationships among primates appears to be 30 million years old.

Voice as a medium for language is a recent development in evolutionary terms, but it has become a crucial part of our social interactions. And it does not stand alone. We rely on a panoply of sensory experiences to navigate the medium of sound. The multisensory ensemble helps us to discuss a speaker's emotions and feelings through the conveyance of voice, creating interior meaning through metaphor. Description of touch and other senses can illuminate voice's deep meaning and its acoustic properties at once. Next time you hear a soft voice, reflect on the engaging feeling of softness that makes your experience so much more meaningful.

This article was originally published by Aeon.

Raising Your Vibration - Marilyn Allen PhD

Move your body around

Have faith

Have good intentions

Listen to your gut instinct

Have self belief

Think happy thoughts

Play music

Smile

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Let's Talk About ... Hibiscus Tea Marilyn Allen PhD

Also known as Agua de Jamaica.

- rich in Vitamin C
- can help with digestive issues
- can help with circulation issues
- can help with cholesterol issues
- can help support the immune system
- can help manage blood pressure issues (AHA 2008)
- can help manage hormonal issues
- said to be beneficial for weight issues
- said to be beneficial for sugar regulation issues- said to help with urinary tract issues
- can be drunk hot or cold
- very refreshing
- very reasonably priced

photocredit: naturalhealthonline

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Quantum Biofeedback Devices at Our Clinic - Marilyn Allen PhD

Using Quantum Biofeedback devices to get positive results for clients in our clinic, is  one of the most gratifying jobs ever! We use the -

- Scio-Eductor

- Cybermagnetic Chair

- SCENAR Cosmodic

- Airnergy

For stress reduction, pain management, adipose tissue dissolve, chakra alignment, aura cleansing and much much more.

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Let's Talk About ... Nuts - Marilyn Allen PhD

Eating tree nuts lower the risk of :

- cancers
- infection
- diabetes
- cardiovascular issues
- mortality

So... macademia, pecans, hazelnuts, pine, almonds and cashew nuts are the snacks to have at least once a day. Watch out for high salt content!

Photocredit: Befituk

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Let's Talk About ... Good Fats

Real fats are good. Industrial fats are bad. Very simple. So... cut out the bad fats. Eat whole good fats (not half fat, skinny fat, skimmed fat etc). Invest in yourself. Let your health be your wealth.

Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil

Let Us Talk About ... Okro

 It is said to help manage diabetes mellitus
- It is said to help manage cholesterol
- Has Vitamin K so helps with blood clotting
- Helps fortify bones bones
- Has Vitamin A which is said to help eyesight issues
- Helps boost the immune system
- Helps prevent gastritis
- Helps manage liver issues
- Might help people predisposed to Alzheimer's Disease
- Might help manage fatigue
- Has high Vitamin C content
- Might help manage respiratory issues
- Might help manage breast issues
- It is easy to cook
- can be added to meals as a side dish
- An all year round vegetable

References

Khatun, Hajera, Ajijur Rahman, Mohitosh Biswas, and Anwar Ul Islam. “Water-soluble fraction of Abelmoschus esculentus L Interacts with glucose and metformin hydrochloride and alters their absorption kinetics after coadministration in rats.” ISRN pharmaceutics 2011 (2011).

Mairuae, Nootchanat, James R. Connor, Sang Y. Lee, Poonlarp Cheepsunthorn, and Walaiporn Tongjaroenbuangam. “The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer’s disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.” Neuroscience letters 603 (2015): 6-11

Breast Cancer. U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Alqasoumi, S. I. “‘Okra’Hibiscus esculentus L.: A study of its hepatoprotective activity.” Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal 20, no. 2 (2012): 135-141.

Lengsfeld, Christian, Fritz Titgemeyer, Gerhard Faller, and Andreas Hensel. “Glycosylated compounds from okra inhibit adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucosa.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 52, no. 6 (2004): 1495-1503.

Wang, Hong, Gu Chen, Dandan Ren, and Shang‐Tian Yang. “Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.” Phytotherapy Research 28, no. 2 (2014): 268-273.

Xia, Fangbo, Yu Zhong, Mengqiu Li, Qi Chang, Yonghong Liao, Xinmin Liu, and Ruile Pan. “Antioxidant and anti-fatigue constituents of okra.” Nutrients 7, no. 10 (2015): 8846-8858.

Monte, Leonardo G., Tatiane Santi-Gadelha, Larissa B. Reis, Elizandra Braganhol, Rafael F. Prietsch, Odir A. Dellagostin, Rodrigo Rodrigues e Lacerda, Carlos AA Gadelha, Fabricio R. Conceição, and Luciano S. Pinto. “Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.” Biotechnology letters 36, no. 3 (2014): 461-469.

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Let's Talk About ... Maqui Berries - Marilyn Allen PhD

 

Maqui berries also known as Aristotelia Chilensis is native to Argentina and Chile. It contains anthocyanins, extremely potent antioxidants.

- Improves cardiovascular health
- Improves immune system function
- Reducing allergic reactions
- Reducing inflammation
- Slowing down the ageing process
- Helps manage high cholesterol
- Contains anti-diabetic properties
- Improves meabolism
- Contains anti-bacterial properties
- Has some anti-carcinogen effects
- Has anti viral properties
- Can help if you are on a weight loss programme
- Flushes out toxins
- Rich in iron, calcium, vitamin c and potassium

Sprinkle the powder into your breakfast or snack. Let your health be your wealth.

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The Power Of Your Brain - Marilyn Allen PhD

It is said that you have about 70,000 thoughts every day. Meditation could increase your IQ and relieve stress. The subconscious mind controls 95% of our thoughts whilst the conscious mind controls our brains only about 5% of the day. Our brains are made of two thirds of fat. Replenishing these fats is essential for the brain to function properly and prevent diseases like depression, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Disease. Listening to music changes the structure of it and strengthens the brain. The brain makes mental meaning of your thoughts turning them into physical reality. Enjoy looking after your brain and reap the rewards but most of all, enjoy your chosen genre of music!

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