#marilynallentherapeuticcounselling

The New You... - Dr Marilyn Allen PhD

Unexpressed emotions will not go away. They are buried temporarily and will resurface in much complex ways later. Look after your body holistically. There is very little benefit in looking after your body but neglecting your mind. Look after your mind and your body will look after itself!

Holistic Medicine - Marilyn Allen PhD

Holistic Medicine has been practised over centuries. Holistic Practitioners  integrate Conventional and Alternative Medicine, with a view to prevent illness and promote well being. The treatment focuses on the person as a whole -  psychologically, physically, emotionally, spiritually and  environmentally.  It is good practise to take into consideration, the emotional well being of the patient  at the time of consultation as it is equally important. The Practitioner is better informed about the patient. The patient is involved in the process which psychologically is healthier for patient as he or she feels empowered, thus  more engaging.

Working holistically should be encouraged as good practice across the board, both in conventional and alternative medicine. 

 

Potter P. J. , Frisch N., Holistic Assessment and Care: presence in the process. Nurs Cin North Am 2007 June 42(2): 213- 28 vi

 

Ventegodt s., Kandel I., & Merrick J., A short history of holistic medicine. Scientific World Journal 2007 Oct 57 1622- 30.

How people with sports addiction are like drug addicts

Repost from Aeon by Karin Jongsma who is a bioethicist at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen in Germany. She is interested in identity, technology, representation and autonomy, and is currently working on a research project concerning collective representation in healthcare policy.

Participation in sports is a highly visible aspect of 21st-century life, with a normative dimension. Sport benefits health, encourages self-discipline, and develops character and teamwork. The positive physiological and psychological effects of sport and an active lifestyle are scientifically well-known: improved cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, lower risk of osteoporosis and depression, and an increased life expectancy. Based on all this good news, one might wonder whether there is any downside.

‘Sports addiction’ sounds paradoxical, because we usually reserve the word ‘addiction’ for things that are recognisably bad for us, such as illicit-drug use or alcoholism, but there really is a sense in which you can become addicted to exercise. Even modest athletes can relate to the famous ‘high’ after exercising, triggered by the release of ‘happiness hormones’ such as dopamine and endorphins, which have mood-altering effects. These effects, like those produced by illicit drugs and alcohol, can be habit-forming. As in any addiction, ‘highs’ are important for getting hooked, but the development of an addiction depends on many external factors, too. Sports addiction is not taken seriously by everyone, however: ‘there are worse things to be addicted to’ mockers suggest, as if the term ‘addiction’ is only a metaphor. Sports addiction is, however, real, non-metaphorical, and harmful.

Sport addicts share many symptoms with other sorts of addicts. They harm their bodies: this is because they do not give them the chance of recovering from working out, often because of the intensity, duration and frequency of their training sessions. Sport becomes so much an obsession that such people don’t take time to recover from injuries. Incidence of heart attacks and osteoporosis increase at high levels of exertion, so sports addicts can put themselves at serious risk of harm.

But it is not just a question of physical damage: sports addicts suffer psychological damage too: they become dependent on training for feeling good, and life away from training becomes dull. They can also develop tolerance to the ‘high’, and so need more and more exercise to get the same result. When not exercising, they experience withdrawal effects, depression and anxiety. Sports addiction has negative social effects, too: addicts cancel meetings because they prefer training over friends, family and work, or are mentally not present when they are with other people, so preoccupied are they with mentally preparing for that next training session high.

The complexity of sports addiction lies in the fact that a reasonable amount of exercise and sport is good, but too much can be very harmful indeed. However, such harmful effects are not understood nor widely recognised, as the social perception of sports addiction differs significantly from other types of addiction.

But is it as simple as this? Is sports addiction always something to be ashamed of, something to be treated or overcome? In other areas of physical prowess, significant harm is tolerated for the sake of an outstanding outcome, and might even be the price paid for excellence. Many ballet dancers have ruined feet, for example; and many musicians have injuries as a result of over-practice or repetition in performance. Similarly, many professional boxers suffer from brain damage through repeated sparring, and athletes, footballers and rugby players have been badly injured during high-level sports training.

But these are highly talented people capable of beautiful, exciting and sometimes dangerous things, which ordinary people will never be able to do. Are all of them addicts? Probably not. However, many of them tread a fine line between devotion and addiction, and illustrate how obsessive devotion, beyond ordinary levels, has the double potential both for great achievement and for significant self-harm. If we value the achievement, perhaps we will have to accept that there will be some collateral damage along the way.

Let's Talk About ... Good Fats

Real fats are good. Industrial fats are bad. Very simple. So... cut out the bad fats. Eat whole good fats (not half fat, skinny fat, skimmed fat etc). Invest in yourself. Let your health be your wealth.

Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil

Let Us Talk About ... Okro

 It is said to help manage diabetes mellitus
- It is said to help manage cholesterol
- Has Vitamin K so helps with blood clotting
- Helps fortify bones bones
- Has Vitamin A which is said to help eyesight issues
- Helps boost the immune system
- Helps prevent gastritis
- Helps manage liver issues
- Might help people predisposed to Alzheimer's Disease
- Might help manage fatigue
- Has high Vitamin C content
- Might help manage respiratory issues
- Might help manage breast issues
- It is easy to cook
- can be added to meals as a side dish
- An all year round vegetable

References

Khatun, Hajera, Ajijur Rahman, Mohitosh Biswas, and Anwar Ul Islam. “Water-soluble fraction of Abelmoschus esculentus L Interacts with glucose and metformin hydrochloride and alters their absorption kinetics after coadministration in rats.” ISRN pharmaceutics 2011 (2011).

Mairuae, Nootchanat, James R. Connor, Sang Y. Lee, Poonlarp Cheepsunthorn, and Walaiporn Tongjaroenbuangam. “The effects of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn.) on the cellular events associated with Alzheimer’s disease in a stably expressed HFE neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line.” Neuroscience letters 603 (2015): 6-11

Breast Cancer. U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Alqasoumi, S. I. “‘Okra’Hibiscus esculentus L.: A study of its hepatoprotective activity.” Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal 20, no. 2 (2012): 135-141.

Lengsfeld, Christian, Fritz Titgemeyer, Gerhard Faller, and Andreas Hensel. “Glycosylated compounds from okra inhibit adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human gastric mucosa.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 52, no. 6 (2004): 1495-1503.

Wang, Hong, Gu Chen, Dandan Ren, and Shang‐Tian Yang. “Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.” Phytotherapy Research 28, no. 2 (2014): 268-273.

Xia, Fangbo, Yu Zhong, Mengqiu Li, Qi Chang, Yonghong Liao, Xinmin Liu, and Ruile Pan. “Antioxidant and anti-fatigue constituents of okra.” Nutrients 7, no. 10 (2015): 8846-8858.

Monte, Leonardo G., Tatiane Santi-Gadelha, Larissa B. Reis, Elizandra Braganhol, Rafael F. Prietsch, Odir A. Dellagostin, Rodrigo Rodrigues e Lacerda, Carlos AA Gadelha, Fabricio R. Conceição, and Luciano S. Pinto. “Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.” Biotechnology letters 36, no. 3 (2014): 461-469.

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